IB PYP

While recognizing the importance of concepts, knowledge and skills, the IBPYP and Coronation School believe that these alone do not make an internationally educated person. It is vital that we also focus on the development of positive attitudes towards people, towards the environment and towards learning. 

pyp-hexagon

We want students to develop:

  • Appreciation: appreciating the wonder and beauty of the world and its people
  • Commitment: being committed to their learning, persevering and showing self-discipline and responsibility
  • Confidence: feeling confident in their ability as learners, having the courage to take risks, applying what they have learned and making appropriate decisions
  • Cooperation: cooperating, collaborating and leading or following as the situation demands
  • Creativity: being creative and imaginative in their thinking and in their approach to problems and dilemmas
  • Curiosity: being curious about the nature of learning and of the world, its people and cultures
  • Empathy: imaginatively projecting themselves into another's situation, in order to understand his/her thoughts, reasoning and emotions
  • Enthusiasm: enjoying learning
  • Independence: thinking and acting independently, making their own judgments based on reasoned principles and being able to defend their judgments
  • Integrity: having integrity and a firm sense of fairness and honesty
  • Respect: respecting themselves, others and the world around them
  • Tolerance: feeling sensitivity towards differences and diversity in the world and being responsive to the needs of others

 IB Learner Profile

The aim of all IB programmes is to develop internationally minded people who, recognizing their common humanity and shared guardianship of the planet, help to create a better and more peaceful world.

IB learners strive to be:

  • Inquirers: They develop their natural curiosity.  They acquire the skills necessary to conduct inquiry and research and show independence in learning.  They actively enjoy learning and this love of learning will be sustained throughout their lives.
  • Thinkers: They exercise initiative in applying thinking skills critically and creatively to recognize and approach complex problems, and make reasoned, ethical decisions.
  • Communicators: They understand and express ideas and information confidently and creatively in more than one language and in a variety of modes of communication.  They work effectively and willingly in collaboration with others.
  • Risk-takers: They approach unfamiliar situations and uncertainty with courage and forethought, and have the independence of spirit to explore new roles, ideas and strategies.  They are brave and articulate in defending their beliefs.
  • Knowledgeable: They explore concepts, ideas and issues that have local and global significance.  In doing so, they acquire in-depth knowledge and develop understanding across a broad and balanced range of disciplines.
  • Principled: They act with integrity and honesty, with a strong sense of fairness, justice and respect for the dignity of the individual, groups and communities.  They take responsibility for their own actions and the consequences that accompany them.
  • Caring: They show empathy, compassion and respect towards the needs and feelings of others.  They have a personal commitment to service, and act to make a positive difference to the lives of others and to the environment.
  • Open-minded: They understand and appreciate their own cultures and personal histories, and are open to the perspectives, values and traditions of other individuals and communities.  They are accustomed to seeking and evaluating a range of points of view, and are willing to grow from the experience.
  • Balanced: They understand the importance of intellectual, physical and emotional balance to achieve personal well-being for themselves and others.
  • Reflective: They give thoughtful consideration to their own learning and experience.  They are able to assess and understand their strengths and limitations in order to support their learning and personal development.

Mission & Philosophy of the International Baccalaureate Programme

IBO mission statement:

The International Baccalaureate Organization aims to develop inquiring, knowledgeable and caring young people who help to create a better and more peaceful world through intercultural understanding and respect.

To this end the IBO works with schools, governments and international organizations to develop challenging programmes of international education and rigorous assessment.

These programmes encourage students across the world to become active, compassionate and lifelong learners who understand that other people, with their differences, can also be right.

Primary Years Programme

The IB Primary Years Programme (PYP) at Coronation is designed for students in grades Kindergarten through grade five. The curriculum framework provides for the development of the whole child. The PYP is a uniquely international program focusing on the total growth of the developing child, encompassing social, physical, emotional and cultural needs in addition to academics.

The International Baccalaureate Primary Years Programme (IBPYP) provides a shared curriculum for primary schools throughout the world. It does not replace the district scope and sequence or the provincial requirements but expands on them providing breadth and depth to understanding for primary age children. In addition, it provides the students with an international perspective that relates their world in Canada and Alberta to a larger global community. The curriculum is designed as an interactive whole, which eventually encompasses the full range of disciplines and adds to the district and provincial guidelines.

Key Concepts

Programme of Inquiry

A Programme of Inquiry designed around six transdisciplinary themes with multitudes of inquiry based activities is used to integrate the curriculum.

Transdisciplinary Themes

  • Who we are
  • Where we are in place and time
  • How we express ourselves
  • How the world works
  • How we organize ourselves
  • Sharing the planet

Your child will:

  • develop a deep understanding of important concepts;
  • conduct research into knowledge which has local and global significance;
  • acquire and practice a wide range of essential skills in Language Arts, Math, Science, Social Studies, Technology, Art, Music, P.E. and French;
  • learn more effectively using inquiry;
  • learn and use the skills of a second language;
  • be encouraged to develop positive attitudes towards learning, the environment and other people;
  • have the opportunity for involvement in responsible action and community service;
  • manipulate the many facets of technology to become responsible users of the tool;
  • and finally, develop the conceptual understanding and knowledge, skills and attitudes needed to not only succeed at the district and state curriculum, but surpass in both breadth and depth those expectations.

It is a balanced program of concepts, knowledge, skills, attitudes and actions for children that is academically challenging including an extensive French language component. The primary curriculum sets high standards and has high expectations for the students. The teachers and administrator, working with the international guidelines of the IBPYP and the district and provincial standards, plan the primary program together. This provides a more coherent education reflective of the district and provincial standards and the community as well as an international perspective.

Adopted: Guide to the Primary Years Programme , September 1998, IBO; and Making the PYP Happen, January 2007, IBO

IB Primary Years Programme

Process of Inquiry

We derive meaning and knowledge by asking questions. According to Nancy Cecil in The Art of Inquiry, real learning begins to take place when children are engaged in asking and answering carefully crafted questions. Inquiry gives them an "opportunity to explore with their minds, to gain meaning for themselves, and to relate new data to old ideas. When children seek to ask or answer questions about things for which there are many potentially correct answers they begin to develop an attitude of appreciation for the immensity and complexity of the natural world."

Eight key concepts, expressed as questions, propel the process of inquiry. They are broad in scope and are intended to define clusters of ideas. These powerful ideas drive the research units-called Units of Inquiry -which are designed by teachers and students and lie at the heart of the curriculum model.

These key concepts are:

  • Form: What is it like?
  • Function: How does it work?
  • Causation: Why is it like it is?
  • Change: How is it changing?
  • Connection: How is it connected to other things?
  • Perspective: What are the points of view?
  • Responsibility: What is our responsibility?
  • Reflection: How do we know?

Adopted: Guide to the Primary Years Programme, September 1998, IBO;  and Making the PYP Happen, January 2007, IBO

IB PYP and Inquiry: What does it look Like in Kindergarten?

Coronation Kindergarten students are actively involved in exploring things that interest them both inside and outside of the classroom. These investigations are fun and exciting, opening the door to even more things to explore. An important part of students' inquiry is telling others what they see, what they think, and what it makes them wonder about. Students are provided with lots of time to talk about what they observe and opportunities to compare their observations with those of others.  These investigations also begin the process of children asking and answering their own questions, which is at the heart of the inquiry experience. The IB PYP unit planners lend themselves naturally to the inquiry process in Kindergarten.  Kindergarten students at Coronation are also being introduced to the idea of taking action about something they've learned. This could be as simple as a thank you note to a visitor or as complex as a poster telling people how then can take care of their world. Coronation Kindergarten students are natural inquirers!

Authors:  Coronation School staff

Rigor, Relevance and Relationships

Rigor in an IB PYP Education - What Makes an IB Education Rigorous?

A word that is often mentioned in discussions about education today is “rigor”. This word can have many different interpretations by parents, teachers, students, policy-makers and the general public. As an IB World School, Coronation has a high standard of rigor to aim for in the education of students. Our definition of rigor is in alignment with the philosophy of IB PYP as we apply research-based best practices in international education that successfully prepare students for the challenges of the 21st century. 
As the Coronation staff strives to challenge Coronation students with rigorous learning experiences, the following practices guide our instructional planning and delivery.

Rigor in the classroom is established by:

  • Involving students actively in their own learning
  • Engaging students with rich, relevant content
  • High level questioning (by adults and students)
  • Providing opportunities for students to express voice and choice
  • Emphasis on depth of learning, not just coverage
  • Challenging all students to use critical thinking skills (such as analyzing, synthesizing and evaluating information and making inferences, considering multiple perspectives of an issue, defending a position and reflecting on their learning)
  • Using ongoing assessment to identify students’ current level of understanding and adjust instruction to meet individual needs
  • Empowering students to apply what they learned through self-initiated action in their community and around the world
  • Parents should feel encouraged that the education their children receive at Coronation IB World School is indeed rigorous. We are thankful for everything parents do at home to support the rigor of children’s learning experiences at Coronation!

What makes an IB PYP Education Relevant?

The Primary Years Program has identified six areas of knowledge – called transdisciplinary themes – that are considered to be of lasting significance for all students and for all cultures. These themes provide a framework for teachers to design units of inquiry that incorporate provincial curriculum learning standards as well as opportunities for students to develop the skills, attitudes, concepts and knowledge needed to become internationally-minded people and life-long learners.

PYP units of inquiry approach learning as being transdisciplinary in nature. Teachers use structured inquiry to guide students through each unit while incorporating perspectives from a variety of fields of knowledge (scientific, mathematical, technological, artistic, musical, historical, cultural, social) to build on their past experiences and reach new learning.

The six transdisciplinary themes are addressed at each grade level, even though the individual units of inquiry based upon them are all unique, exploring different aspects of the knowledge contained under each theme. In addition to six yearly transdisciplinary units of inquiry based upon the PYP transdisciplinary themes, students receive daily instruction in Math, Reading and Writing to ensure that they continue to develop their skills in those foundational subject areas. 
The PYP transdisciplinary themes are as follows:

  • Who We Are - Exploring ourselves, our beliefs and values, rights and responsibilities, our friends, families and cultures.
  • Where We Are in Place and Time - Exploring our location in place and time, our personal histories, local and global history and geography, migrations and discoveries of ourselves and others, the contributions of individuals and civilizations.
  • How We Express Ourselves - Exploring the myriad ways that we discover and express ourselves, our ideas, our feelings, our cultures, and our beliefs and values.
  • How the World Works - Exploring natural and human-made phenomena and the world of science and technology and their impact on society and on the environment.
  • How We Organize Ourselves - Exploring human-made systems and communities and their impact on society and the environment.
  • Sharing the Planet - Exploring relationships between living things and how humans and other living things share resources and opportunities.

What about Relationships  in an IB World School?

Relationships matter! It’s not the worksheets that your child will remember; it’s the challenges that are given to achieve what he/she might seem impossible to be possible! These relationships strengthen the character of our school and remove the risk factors to enable learning to take place. It's difficult to fully express how vital relationships are, but this sentiment comes close: When the spirit of people is strong, focused and vibrant, wonderful things happen.

IB PYP

While recognizing the importance of concepts, knowledge and skills, the IBPYP and Coronation School believe that these alone do not make an internationally educated person. It is vital that we also focus on the development of positive attitudes towards people, towards the environment and towards learning. 

pyp-hexagon

We want students to develop:

  • Appreciation: appreciating the wonder and beauty of the world and its people
  • Commitment: being committed to their learning, persevering and showing self-discipline and responsibility
  • Confidence: feeling confident in their ability as learners, having the courage to take risks, applying what they have learned and making appropriate decisions
  • Cooperation: cooperating, collaborating and leading or following as the situation demands
  • Creativity: being creative and imaginative in their thinking and in their approach to problems and dilemmas
  • Curiosity: being curious about the nature of learning and of the world, its people and cultures
  • Empathy: imaginatively projecting themselves into another's situation, in order to understand his/her thoughts, reasoning and emotions
  • Enthusiasm: enjoying learning
  • Independence: thinking and acting independently, making their own judgments based on reasoned principles and being able to defend their judgments
  • Integrity: having integrity and a firm sense of fairness and honesty
  • Respect: respecting themselves, others and the world around them
  • Tolerance: feeling sensitivity towards differences and diversity in the world and being responsive to the needs of others

 IB Learner Profile

The aim of all IB programmes is to develop internationally minded people who, recognizing their common humanity and shared guardianship of the planet, help to create a better and more peaceful world.

IB learners strive to be:

  • Inquirers: They develop their natural curiosity.  They acquire the skills necessary to conduct inquiry and research and show independence in learning.  They actively enjoy learning and this love of learning will be sustained throughout their lives.
  • Thinkers: They exercise initiative in applying thinking skills critically and creatively to recognize and approach complex problems, and make reasoned, ethical decisions.
  • Communicators: They understand and express ideas and information confidently and creatively in more than one language and in a variety of modes of communication.  They work effectively and willingly in collaboration with others.
  • Risk-takers: They approach unfamiliar situations and uncertainty with courage and forethought, and have the independence of spirit to explore new roles, ideas and strategies.  They are brave and articulate in defending their beliefs.
  • Knowledgeable: They explore concepts, ideas and issues that have local and global significance.  In doing so, they acquire in-depth knowledge and develop understanding across a broad and balanced range of disciplines.
  • Principled: They act with integrity and honesty, with a strong sense of fairness, justice and respect for the dignity of the individual, groups and communities.  They take responsibility for their own actions and the consequences that accompany them.
  • Caring: They show empathy, compassion and respect towards the needs and feelings of others.  They have a personal commitment to service, and act to make a positive difference to the lives of others and to the environment.
  • Open-minded: They understand and appreciate their own cultures and personal histories, and are open to the perspectives, values and traditions of other individuals and communities.  They are accustomed to seeking and evaluating a range of points of view, and are willing to grow from the experience.
  • Balanced: They understand the importance of intellectual, physical and emotional balance to achieve personal well-being for themselves and others.
  • Reflective: They give thoughtful consideration to their own learning and experience.  They are able to assess and understand their strengths and limitations in order to support their learning and personal development.

Mission & Philosophy of the International Baccalaureate Programme

IBO mission statement:

The International Baccalaureate Organization aims to develop inquiring, knowledgeable and caring young people who help to create a better and more peaceful world through intercultural understanding and respect.

To this end the IBO works with schools, governments and international organizations to develop challenging programmes of international education and rigorous assessment.

These programmes encourage students across the world to become active, compassionate and lifelong learners who understand that other people, with their differences, can also be right.

Primary Years Programme

The IB Primary Years Programme (PYP) at Coronation is designed for students in grades Kindergarten through grade five. The curriculum framework provides for the development of the whole child. The PYP is a uniquely international program focusing on the total growth of the developing child, encompassing social, physical, emotional and cultural needs in addition to academics.

The International Baccalaureate Primary Years Programme (IBPYP) provides a shared curriculum for primary schools throughout the world. It does not replace the district scope and sequence or the provincial requirements but expands on them providing breadth and depth to understanding for primary age children. In addition, it provides the students with an international perspective that relates their world in Canada and Alberta to a larger global community. The curriculum is designed as an interactive whole, which eventually encompasses the full range of disciplines and adds to the district and provincial guidelines.

Key Concepts

Programme of Inquiry

A Programme of Inquiry designed around six transdisciplinary themes with multitudes of inquiry based activities is used to integrate the curriculum.

Transdisciplinary Themes

  • Who we are
  • Where we are in place and time
  • How we express ourselves
  • How the world works
  • How we organize ourselves
  • Sharing the planet

Your child will:

  • develop a deep understanding of important concepts;
  • conduct research into knowledge which has local and global significance;
  • acquire and practice a wide range of essential skills in Language Arts, Math, Science, Social Studies, Technology, Art, Music, P.E. and French;
  • learn more effectively using inquiry;
  • learn and use the skills of a second language;
  • be encouraged to develop positive attitudes towards learning, the environment and other people;
  • have the opportunity for involvement in responsible action and community service;
  • manipulate the many facets of technology to become responsible users of the tool;
  • and finally, develop the conceptual understanding and knowledge, skills and attitudes needed to not only succeed at the district and state curriculum, but surpass in both breadth and depth those expectations.

It is a balanced program of concepts, knowledge, skills, attitudes and actions for children that is academically challenging including an extensive French language component. The primary curriculum sets high standards and has high expectations for the students. The teachers and administrator, working with the international guidelines of the IBPYP and the district and provincial standards, plan the primary program together. This provides a more coherent education reflective of the district and provincial standards and the community as well as an international perspective.

Adopted: Guide to the Primary Years Programme , September 1998, IBO; and Making the PYP Happen, January 2007, IBO

IB Primary Years Programme

Process of Inquiry

We derive meaning and knowledge by asking questions. According to Nancy Cecil in The Art of Inquiry, real learning begins to take place when children are engaged in asking and answering carefully crafted questions. Inquiry gives them an "opportunity to explore with their minds, to gain meaning for themselves, and to relate new data to old ideas. When children seek to ask or answer questions about things for which there are many potentially correct answers they begin to develop an attitude of appreciation for the immensity and complexity of the natural world."

Eight key concepts, expressed as questions, propel the process of inquiry. They are broad in scope and are intended to define clusters of ideas. These powerful ideas drive the research units-called Units of Inquiry -which are designed by teachers and students and lie at the heart of the curriculum model.

These key concepts are:

  • Form: What is it like?
  • Function: How does it work?
  • Causation: Why is it like it is?
  • Change: How is it changing?
  • Connection: How is it connected to other things?
  • Perspective: What are the points of view?
  • Responsibility: What is our responsibility?
  • Reflection: How do we know?

Adopted: Guide to the Primary Years Programme, September 1998, IBO;  and Making the PYP Happen, January 2007, IBO

IB PYP and Inquiry: What does it look Like in Kindergarten?

Coronation Kindergarten students are actively involved in exploring things that interest them both inside and outside of the classroom. These investigations are fun and exciting, opening the door to even more things to explore. An important part of students' inquiry is telling others what they see, what they think, and what it makes them wonder about. Students are provided with lots of time to talk about what they observe and opportunities to compare their observations with those of others.  These investigations also begin the process of children asking and answering their own questions, which is at the heart of the inquiry experience. The IB PYP unit planners lend themselves naturally to the inquiry process in Kindergarten.  Kindergarten students at Coronation are also being introduced to the idea of taking action about something they've learned. This could be as simple as a thank you note to a visitor or as complex as a poster telling people how then can take care of their world. Coronation Kindergarten students are natural inquirers!

Authors:  Coronation School staff

Rigor, Relevance and Relationships

Rigor in an IB PYP Education - What Makes an IB Education Rigorous?

A word that is often mentioned in discussions about education today is “rigor”. This word can have many different interpretations by parents, teachers, students, policy-makers and the general public. As an IB World School, Coronation has a high standard of rigor to aim for in the education of students. Our definition of rigor is in alignment with the philosophy of IB PYP as we apply research-based best practices in international education that successfully prepare students for the challenges of the 21st century. 
As the Coronation staff strives to challenge Coronation students with rigorous learning experiences, the following practices guide our instructional planning and delivery.

Rigor in the classroom is established by:

  • Involving students actively in their own learning
  • Engaging students with rich, relevant content
  • High level questioning (by adults and students)
  • Providing opportunities for students to express voice and choice
  • Emphasis on depth of learning, not just coverage
  • Challenging all students to use critical thinking skills (such as analyzing, synthesizing and evaluating information and making inferences, considering multiple perspectives of an issue, defending a position and reflecting on their learning)
  • Using ongoing assessment to identify students’ current level of understanding and adjust instruction to meet individual needs
  • Empowering students to apply what they learned through self-initiated action in their community and around the world
  • Parents should feel encouraged that the education their children receive at Coronation IB World School is indeed rigorous. We are thankful for everything parents do at home to support the rigor of children’s learning experiences at Coronation!

What makes an IB PYP Education Relevant?

The Primary Years Program has identified six areas of knowledge – called transdisciplinary themes – that are considered to be of lasting significance for all students and for all cultures. These themes provide a framework for teachers to design units of inquiry that incorporate provincial curriculum learning standards as well as opportunities for students to develop the skills, attitudes, concepts and knowledge needed to become internationally-minded people and life-long learners.

PYP units of inquiry approach learning as being transdisciplinary in nature. Teachers use structured inquiry to guide students through each unit while incorporating perspectives from a variety of fields of knowledge (scientific, mathematical, technological, artistic, musical, historical, cultural, social) to build on their past experiences and reach new learning.

The six transdisciplinary themes are addressed at each grade level, even though the individual units of inquiry based upon them are all unique, exploring different aspects of the knowledge contained under each theme. In addition to six yearly transdisciplinary units of inquiry based upon the PYP transdisciplinary themes, students receive daily instruction in Math, Reading and Writing to ensure that they continue to develop their skills in those foundational subject areas. 
The PYP transdisciplinary themes are as follows:

  • Who We Are - Exploring ourselves, our beliefs and values, rights and responsibilities, our friends, families and cultures.
  • Where We Are in Place and Time - Exploring our location in place and time, our personal histories, local and global history and geography, migrations and discoveries of ourselves and others, the contributions of individuals and civilizations.
  • How We Express Ourselves - Exploring the myriad ways that we discover and express ourselves, our ideas, our feelings, our cultures, and our beliefs and values.
  • How the World Works - Exploring natural and human-made phenomena and the world of science and technology and their impact on society and on the environment.
  • How We Organize Ourselves - Exploring human-made systems and communities and their impact on society and the environment.
  • Sharing the Planet - Exploring relationships between living things and how humans and other living things share resources and opportunities.

What about Relationships  in an IB World School?

Relationships matter! It’s not the worksheets that your child will remember; it’s the challenges that are given to achieve what he/she might seem impossible to be possible! These relationships strengthen the character of our school and remove the risk factors to enable learning to take place. It's difficult to fully express how vital relationships are, but this sentiment comes close: When the spirit of people is strong, focused and vibrant, wonderful things happen.

   

Assessment Plan

Upcoming Events

new-schoolzone-216

Photo Gallery